STREAM SENSE: IMPROVING YOUR CHANCES TO HOOK-UP

FALL N' DREAMS

CHASING TURBO CHARGED BROWNS

OVERLOOKED ABUNDANCE: TERRESTRIALS THROUGH THE SEASONS

Mono-Loop Hopper by Ryan Sparks

Tue Aug 14th 2018

Additional pattern, the Mono-Loop Hopper, from Ryan Sparks’ article in the latest issue of Fly Fusion.

Mono-Loop Hopper Recipe

Hook: Dai-Riki 700B, #10

Thread: UTC 140, dark tan

Mono-loops: 10 lb. monofilament

Body: Superfine Dry Fly Dubbing, tan

Overbody: 2mm foam, tan

Wing: 2mm foam, tan

Overwing: Antron yarn, white

Legs: Barred round rubber legs, yellow/black

Indicator: 2mm foam, orange

 

Mop-Top Beetle by Ryan Sparks

Tue Aug 14th 2018

Additional pattern, the Mop-Top Beetle, from Ryan Sparks’ article in the latest issue of Fly Fusion.

Recipe

Hook: Fulling Mill 35025, #8

Thread/Body: Veevus 140, black

Hackle: Grizzly Hackle

Shell: 2mm foam, black

Legs: Medium round rubber legs, black

Indicator: 2mm foam, orange

Post: McFlylon, orange

Seuss, Pooh, and the Inner You

Mon Aug 13th 2018

Dinner parties and tastes aside, my inner child joins me on every trip to the river. I suspect the reason for this is best summed up by Christopher Robin’s honey loving companion when he said, “When you see someone putting on his Big Boots, you can be pretty sure that an adventure is going to happen.” For me, the biggest boots I have happen to be my wading boots, which is perfect because there are fewer things that my adult self and my inner child enjoy more than a fly-fishing excursion.

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Fly Fusion and "Fall 'N Dreams"

Thu Aug 9th 2018

The latest issue has arrived! The fall edition is packed with hot terrestrial patterns, new autumn dries, guide tips to take your skills to the next level, and Matt Guymon’s photo essay “Fall ‘N Dreams” . To check out all this and so much more purchase the fall issue on newsstands or click here to subscribe.

 

The Wary Approach

Thu Aug 2nd 2018

In many ways [the approach] is simple: Don’t scare the fish before you cast to them. A scared fish is no longer a candidate for a hero photograph, or, as my friend Bob Scammell so succinctly put it, “Nobody’s good enough to catch a terrified trout.”

While the fish in heavily fished waters are usually more tolerant of an angler’s presence, you can still put them off their feeding by getting too close, by sending a wading wake out to alert them, by making sloppy deliveries too close to them, or by false casting over them when they’re in shallow water or near the surface. So watch awhile first before barging in and starting to cast. Look the situation over. Are the fish rising? If so, to what? Look at the water near you and try to see what bugs are on the surface. If you don’t see anything right at the surface, try to find out what’s drifting just beneath the surface (a small aquarium net or piece of screen makes this easier). All this will give you an idea of what fly to start with.

Jim McLennan, Managing Editor

Trico FYI

Mon Jul 30th 2018

The best Trico fishing comes in the heaviest spinner falls and those occur on the best Trico-days, which are those that begin with bright, warm, calm mornings. Cooler weather delays or severely reduces the intensity of the spinner fall, and wind can blow the spinners away from the river.

As summer progresses the spinner fall occurs later and later in the morning. When the hatch begins in mid-July or early August, spinners might be on the water by 8:00 am. Around Labour Day it might occur around 10:00, and by late September it could be noon before spinners come down. All these times are subject to weather, and particularly air-temperature variations.

When the flies are thick on the surface, the fish like to hold in shallow water along the stream banks, or just beneath the surface in slightly deeper water midstream. They find a lane of slow, steady current that delivers lots of flies and rise subtly, but frequently, making the most of an easy meal.

Jim McLennan, Managing Editor 

Hot Summer Tip: Selecting Flies on Technical Water

Thu Jul 26th 2018

“This is a type of fishing where we can throw out the “pattern versus presentation” debate. Here, both must be right. Your pre-fishing research should lead you to some suggestions about fly patterns for the particular stream at the time you’re going to be there. My further advice is to carry a number of different patterns to imitate each stage of the hatch you’re likely to encounter. If you’re going to be on a tailwater river at pale morning dun time, you’d better have two or three different emerger patterns, a few dun imitations and a couple of different spinner patterns, for both the male and female spinners (the natural males and female spinners are different colours). Be prepared to run through your fly selection often too, changing flies as soon as you’re sure that the fish has seen the last one presented perfectly. Your best odds for a take are on the first two perfect presentations. After that, your chances drop quickly. So don’t keep hammering away with the fly that worked on the previous fish, because for some annoying reason different fish often want different imitations. Yes, I know, it’s not supposed to work that way. When we find the right fly, we believe we’ve “broken the code,” meaning we’re home free and able to catch most every fish we throw at. But it often doesn’t work like that on the toughest of technical water, and you might need to try a number of flies for each different feeding trout you encounter.” Jim McLennan, Managing Editor

 

Hot Summer Tip: Presenting to Fussy Trout

Mon Jul 23rd 2018

“Your fly should alight on the water far enough upstream of the fish that its landing doesn’t frighten the fish, but close enough to the fish that the leader and line don’t come tight and produce drag until the after fly has drifted past the fish and is out of its sight. There are a number of casting positions that allow you to accomplish this, including the traditional position downstream or down and across from the feeding fish. But you might consider casting from a position up and across from the fish. Though a bit unconventional, this approach gives you the benefit of showing the fish your fly before showing it your leader – and sometimes this is just what’s needed to close the deal with a tough trout. Just be sure that you can get into the proper casting position without scaring the fish. When casting down and across, you need to use a reach cast…” Jim McLennan, Managing Editor 

RIO Adds New Freshwater Lines for 2019

Wed Jul 18th 2018

RIO–The RIO Creek line is designed for small creeks and streams with a taper design that loads at close range but has enough body and head length when a longer cast is needed. It is ideal for nymphs, dries and small streamers, and its supple, coldwater core provides tangle-free performance. RIO’s MaxFloat Tip ensures the line does not sink. Available in WF0-WF4F options in green/yellow coloration for $79.99.

The InTouch Big Nasty Sink Tip line is a multiple density sink tip line designed to cast large and heavy flies thanks to its front-loaded weight distribution and ultra-low stretch ConnectCore. The seamless blend of three or four densities ensures a smooth transition of energy when casting and the best depth control while fishing. It is available in float/hover/intermediate (F/H/I), float/hover/intermediate/sink 3 F/H/I/S3), and a float/intermediate/sink 3/sink 5 design (F/I/S3/S5). The different densities are designed to give anglers the option of fishing at different depths, with the F/H/I an ideal choice for fishing in the top two feet of the water column, the F/H/I/S3 a great line for fishing 2-4 feet in depth, and the F/I/S3/S5 being perfect for fishing between 4-8 feet in depth. Available in August for $99.99

For anglers heading deep into the jungle in pursuit of peacock bass, dorado, or pacu, the DirectCore Jungle Series from RIO is the line of choice. Its powerful front taper delivers large flies with ease, while the easy annealing, low-memory core lays perfectly straight. The hard, tropical coating ensures it will not wilt in the extreme heat. There is a full floating line option and a F/I that has a floating running line with a 30-foot intermediate head with 10-feet of that being clear. The F/S3 is a floating line with the front 20-feet being type 3 sinking (3-4ips). The F/S6 is a floating line with the front 20-feet being a type 6 sinking line (6-7ips). Available at RIO dealers in August for $119.99.

Trout anglers can make an easy choice for leader selection with RIO’s Powerflex Trout Selection. This selection pack contains three different 9-foot trout leaders each being one of the most popular sizes. Consumers can choose between two selections: a 9ft – 3X, 4X, and 5X leader, and the other with a 9ft – 4X, 5X, and 6X leader in. MSRP $12.99.

RIO also adds a new length in its popular Fluoroflex Trout Leaders with 7.5-foot lengths from 5X to 0X for $14.99.

Sole Mates--Orvis and Michelin Team Up

Mon Jul 16th 2018

Michelin Soles has entered into a new partnership with Orvis, the world leader in fly fishing, to equip the company’s Orvis Pro Wading boot with soles featuring Michelin technologies and know-how, which will offer anglers high grip levels in and out of the water, and excellent durability. The boot has been presented during Icast trade show in Florida, Orlando.

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Drift Boat Tip: Cast to Fish Not Rise Forms

Thu Jul 12th 2018

“When you see a trout rise, remember that the rise form drifts downstream with the current, but the trout stays back where it rose. Dont keep casting to the ever-widening rings that conveniently drift along beside you. The fish is still back upstream where the episode started.” Jim McLennan, Managing Editor–Fly Fusion Magazine

Patagonia Announces Innovative Wading Boots For 2019

Tue Jul 10th 2018

Our friends at Patagonia have just announced two of their most innovative fly fishing products to date — the new Foot Tractor Wading Boots and River Salt Wading Boots. These boots are the culmination of years of hard work and research and development in collaboration with Danner, the iconic boot maker and Vibram, maker of high performance outsoles. Patagonia’s and Danner’s quest to build the most durable and highest performing wading boots possible has led to what Patagonia contends are the best boots they have ever made and possibly the last ones anglers will ever need to buy.

To achieve their goals of maximum durability and performance in a long-lasting U.S.A.-made boot, Patagonia paired their expertise in fly fishing and product innovation with Danner’s proud tradition of quality and craftsmanship. Made by hand in Portland, Oregon, both boots are engineered for the most demanding wading and fishing. And with treated full-grain leather and stitch-down construction, they’re designed not only for durability but also to be resoled and even completely recrafted as they wear to keep them on the water and out of the landfill.

The collaboration between Patagonia and Danner began with the idea of offering the best fly fishing boots made in the U.S. For both companies, this meant creating boots that are durable, lightweight, quick drying, and comfortable. “These Danner-built boots are the ultimate fusion of performance, durability, and quality,” notes Chris Gaggia, global marketing manager at Patagonia. “We couldn’t be more pleased with the outcome of our work with Danner, and we’re proud to have a product that will surely endure.”

The durability of both the Foot Tractor Wading Boots and River Salt Wading Boots are the result of stitch-down construction of waterproof full-grain leather and tough 1000-Denier nylon. The saline treated leather is waterproof, non-shrinking, and non-cracking. With technology that prevents swelling, these boots prevent water retention and maintain their appearance. Perforated drains clear water quickly, and nylon webbing saves weight while maintaining strength and support. Nylon-coated hardware also adds an additional element of durability. The stitch-down construction consists of interlocking thread that increases the durability of the boots while also allowing the boots to be resoled and recrafted by Danner. And both boots provide comfort and stability throughout from an insole board, an internal shank for arch support, a cushioned midsole for impact absorption, a wider platform for increased ankle support, and a lace-to-toe design that allows for a more customized fit over the top of the foot.

The River Salt Wading Boots feature low profile adjustable speed lacing evolved from Danner’s Marine Corps boots, and a bi-fit board combines shank, lasting board, and PU midsole into a single piece, thereby providing a lightweight platform. Additionally, a VIBRAM® Megagrip outsole with sticky rubber delivers impressive traction in an out of the water, as well as increased durability. The River Salt Wading Boots are designed specifically for the Middle Fork Packable Waders, wet wading, and the flats. They will be available in Feather Grey for $449.

The Foot Tractor Wading Boots have an adjustable lacing system and a 5mm rubber midsole. With a VIBRAM® Idrogrip outsole for durability and performance, anglers have the choice of sticky rubber ($499), felt ($499), and aluminum bar ($549) for their preference of best traction. The Foot Tractor Wading Boots will be available in Forge Grey.

And while Patagonia and Danner built these boots to endure, the companies’ shared values also brought them together to make boots that could very well be an angler’s ultimate boot purchase. Both boots have options for recrafting at Danner’s world-class facility in Portland, from replacing outsoles and hardware to repairing stitching and reconditioning the leather. Patagonia hopes that anglers will avoid the practice of sending boots to the landfill and will keep these boots in use for many years. This revolutionary approach cuts down on production, spending, and waste and provides the longest possible lifespan for these boots.

The Foot Tractor Wading Boots and River Salt Wading Bootswill be available February, 2019.

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